PERFORMANCE YOGA – 02.09.15 (ANXIETY MANAGEMENT – Part 2)

I’m an analytical person.  I know for some folks this is hard to believe.  I like checklists, to-do lists, procedures, the volume to be at an even number, my clothes organized by the color spectrum and to have my cleaning supplies organized by brand name.  Yep.

There are discussions among Yoga instructors that want classes to be organic and create themselves from the moment.  There are other schools of thought that look to research and preparation along with reviewing notes while teaching.  Athletes do the same.  Some will state how practice is a waste of time and that you grow in the heat of competition.  There are others that work religiously to perfect their skills in practice to bring them to fruition in game time.  I believe there is a place for both … and I have taught and competed from both.  For me, I type all of my class flows so that I can carve them up with feedback from participants and self-reflective words.  I like being prepared.

The reason I do this is because I deal with anxiety after I do things.  Most people enter into an event being anxious and nervous.  I end a lot of classes and tennis matches, hockey games, and races with “what if”s and “should have”s.  Anxiety management is important to me so that I do not end such a great experience (win or lose) with negative self-talk.  My love of checklists loves the content below.  Eight different strategies to help deal with anxiety.  Read, use and have fun!

Anxiety Management:  Go from Panicky to Pumped! (Part 2)

1.  Be well prepared.  Nothing helps build confidence more than knowing that you are ready for the challenge at hand.

2.  Nerves are natural.  No matter how calm your opponents may appear, they are likely experiencing the same level of anxiety – or more so – than you are.

3.  Ally with the anxiety.  Tell yourself, “My body is preparing itself to perform,” and “I’ve done well before, and I can do it again now.”

4.  Breathe evenly and deeply.  Good breathing reduces anxiety by clearing your mind of fog and by reducing physical tension.

5.  Get creative and use your imagination.  Understand that you are bigger and more powerful than this anxious feeling.

6.  Stay in the here and now.  Monitor negative “futurizing” and worrisome thoughts about winning or losing.

7.  Stay on a positive thought channel.  Flip the switch from negative to positive self-talk when you are emotionally spiraling down.

8.  Take yourself lightly.  Always remember that sport is what you do and not who you are.  Smile.  Laugh.  Have a good time.  Ask yourself, “What’s the worst thing that can really happen?”  If the worst does happen, ask, “What can I do to cope?”

Remember that FEAR means to “Face Everything and Respond.”  To perform at a champion’s level, let the butterflies fly in formation!

BOOK – “The Champion’s Mind:  How Great Athletes think, train and thrive.” by Jim Afremow  (BUY IT!)

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